Susan Carrie Hinman

Female 1855 - 1885  (30 years)


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  • Name Susan Carrie Hinman 
    Born 2 Jan 1855 
    Gender Female 
    Died 25 Mar 1885 
    Person ID I71006  Stewartsnydotcom
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 

    Father Charles G. Hinman,   b. 9 Jul 1816,   d. 20 Apr 1884  (Age 67 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Elizabeth A. Bentley,   b. 27 Dec 1827,   d. May 1895  (Age 67 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F30863  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Tracy Richard Clark,   b. Dec 1854, Herkimer County, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1935, Clovis, Fresno, California, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 80 years) 
    Notes 
    • Newspaper Article - Thursday, June 8, 1882 Pulaski Democrat - Pulaski, New York - Clark - Hinman Wedding - The event of the past week, for this community, was the marriage of Tracy R. Clark, M.D., of Genoa, Nebraska, and Miss S. Carrie Hinman, of Pulaski. Thursday evening, June 1st, at 8 o'clock, was the time set for their realized wedding hopes, the Baptist Church the place where should be publicly witnessed their recognized sacred relations. At the time and place designated, these of high hopes appeared. A crowded audience, the many friends of both were already in waiting for them at the church. They entered the church preceded by six ushers, Messrs. George D. Bentley, Edward L. Clark, James H. Betts, of Pulaski; Mr. Adelbert A. Richards, of Utica; Mr. Frank L. Harter, M.D., of Parish; Mr. Charles H. Parsons, of Oneida. These were followed immediately by Mr. Frank D. Hinman and Miss Lila B. McChesney, of Richland, Mrs. Hinman, mother of the bride, leaning on the arm of the groom, and the bride leaning on the arm of her father, Mr. Charles G. Hinman. The novel feature of the occasion was the juvenile appearance of the groom's best and second man, and the maids of the bride, all being under the age of ten years; the best man being Master H. Mott Bentley, second best man, Master John O. Bentley; the first bridesmaid was Miss Genevieve Campbell; second bridesmaid, Miss Dell Campbell. The marriage ceremony was gracefully performed by Pastor Townsend, of whose church both groom and bride are members. After the ceremony a large company of guests repaired to the residence of Mr. Hinman where, after hearty congratulations of the wedded pair, refreshments were bountifully served, and the evening passed most cheerfully amid pleasantries realized and pleasantries prospective. Both Dr. Clark and bride have greatly endeared themselves to the inhabitants of this community by their real excellence of character. Among the membership of the church to which they belong, they are held in wannest esteem, and will be greatly missed. They go from us to Genoa, Nebraska, where Mr. Clark has already established himself in his profession, and is recognized among the rising young physicians of the West. Many will be the developer wishes for their prosperity and happiness, as they together embark for ennobling achievements a life-work grandly done, on the insecure waters of changing time. Many, too, will note with joy, their every advance, and until the luminous goal is worthily reached. The gifts were as follows: One silver cake basket, one silver and cut glass cologne bottle, two silver tea services, one silver sugar spoon, one , half-dozen silver nut picks, silver spoon holder, two silver butter dishes, two dozen silver knives, two silver pickle pastors, silver pine knife, silver cake knife, one-half dozen solid silver teaspoons, silver and china vase, two silver and cut glass bouquet holders, $75 in gold, solid gold sugar spoon, pearl ring, four dozen napkins, four tablecloths, nine towels, three oil paintings, painted plaque, macrame tidy, macrame lambrequin, holder, knitted dishcloth, book "Ladies of the White House," Longfellow's poems, embroidered stand cover, embroidered satin toilet set, satin handkerchief case, embroidered panel satin wall pocket, two white bed quilts, carved holly motto, carved holly cardholder, china tea set, one-half dozen China fruit plates, decorated china water set, "The Jersey Cow," nickel plated tea set, canary bird and cage.
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F30864  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Newspaper Obituary - Thursday, April 2, 1885 Pulaski Democrat - Pulaski, New York - Died - In Genoa, Nance County, Nebraska, March 25, 1885, Susan Carrie, wife of Dr. Tracy R. Clark, aged 30 years. Mrs. Clark was daughter of the late Charles G. Hinman, who for many years resided on North street in this village. Her mother still survives her and it was her sad privilege to be with the dear departed one and tenderly ministered unto her during her last and fatal illness. Mrs. Clark was a twin sister of Mr. Frank D. Hinman, now of Adams. June 1st, 1882, the deceased was united in marriage to Dr. Tracy H. Clark, a rising and popular young physician of Genoa, Nebraska. The ceremony took place in this village at the youth then unbroken home of her parents. It was a glad occasion and rarely do young married people begin wedded life with brighter prospects. Her devoted husband had completed a neat brick residence and in this began a life at once happy and hopeful and attended with the most hearty good wishes of hosts of warm and loving friends. In August last, a son was born in this new pledge of affection served to bind the mother and father still more closely together than ever, were such a thing possible. Not many weeks since, Mrs. Clark, who was not strong, took cold and this ailment developed into a quick consumption which resulted fatally. It may be faintly imagined but not fully understood how terribly such an affliction, coming thus suddenly will crush and prostrate. May the great and merciful Ruler who knoweth all things, sustained husband and mother, and tenderly protect. the little son who cannot realize how great a misfortune is his. For a number of terms Mrs. Clark was a teacher in our graded schools, in which capacity she had rare success. As a humble servant of the Savior and a member of the Pulaski that this church, she was conscientious, self-sacrificing in every good word and work, ever redeeming the time. Her memory will long remain sweet and precious to all who knew her.