Daniel Aylsworth Delano

Male 1828 - 1885  (56 years)


 Set As Default Person    

Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All

  • Name Daniel Aylsworth Delano 
    Born 27 Jun 1828  Watertown, Jefferson, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 29 Apr 1885 
    Person ID I67227  Stewartsnydotcom
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 

    Father Frederick Deans Delano,   d. 8 Oct 1845 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Oliva Unknown,   d. 24 Jul 1835 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F29410  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Caroline M. Yendes 
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F29411  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • April 29, 1885 - Daniel A. Delano, age 56 years, Married, Lumberman, born in New York, Resident of Richland Township for 21 years, Son of Frederick Deans and Olive Delano, died in Pulaski of softening of the liver.
      Newspaper Obituary - Thursday, May 7, 1885 Pulaski Democrat - Pulaski, New York - April 29th, 1885, at his residence in this village, D. A. Delano, aged 57 years. The deceased was born in Watertown, June 27th, 1828. His parents were regular attendants of the Presbyterian church of that city, then a large and flourishing village. It was under the religious influence of that denomination that his youth was reared. His intellectual training and culture was had in the schools and academy of that place. September 30th, 1852, he was married to Miss Caroline M. Yendes of Burrville, the loved and devoted wife who still survives to mourn the loss of a most affectionate and generous hearted husband. In 1877 they celebrated their silver wedding amid the warm congratulations of their many friends at a period of life in which they both seemed to have scarcely passed the bloom and vigor of youth, giving promise and prospect of at least another gathering and greeting on that festal occasion when the golden anniversary should dawn upon them. The deceased possessed by nature a cheerful, genial disposition and a kind and sympathetic heart. Generous, helpful and considerate of the feelings of others, he won for himself only friends. He never made an enemy. Throughout a long period of failing health, even when he seemed to be near the grave, he was still cheerful and hopeful, and although disinclined to converse on the subject of death, expressed himself as neither afraid nor unwilling to die. He was a regular attentive attendant on the religious services of the Congregational church of this village, and a generous supporter of it. His death has called forth from a wide circle of acquaintances only expressions of profound respect for his character and memory and sorrowful sympathy for the bereaved.