Sybil Sheldon Weed

Female 1803 - 1854  (51 years)


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  • Name Sybil Sheldon Weed 
    Born 1803 
    Gender Female 
    Died 19 Apr 1854  Pulaski, Oswego, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I65033  Stewartsnydotcom
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 

    Father Eli Smith Weed,   b. 1772, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Apr 1853  (Age 81 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Ancestors Thankful Sheldon,   b. 28 Jun 1779, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Aug 1869  (Age 90 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F14499  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Ancestors Thomas Carswell Baker,   b. 1797,   d. 1883  (Age 86 years) 
    Married 10 Aug 1822  Pulaski, Oswego, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • 1822 Married: Pulaski, Aug. 10th, THOMAS C. BAKER, merchant and MISS SYBIL S. WEED, both of Pulaski.
    Children 
    Married: 1x1. Mary Gridley Baker,   b. Abt 1828,   d. 4 Mar 1899  (Age ~ 71 years)  [natural]
     2. Frank Baker,   b. 22 Aug 1840, Pulaski, Oswego, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Sep 1915  (Age 75 years)  [natural]
     3. Thomas H. Baker,   b. Abt 1834,   d. 5 Jan 1890, Brooklyn, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 56 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F14917  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Newspaper Obituary - Thursday, April 27, 1854 Pulaski Democrat - Pulaski, New York - Died - On the 19th inst., at her residence in this village, Mrs. Sybil S., wife of Thomas C. Baker, aged 50 years. Mrs. Baker has left a circle of friends who will long mourn her loss. For many years a member of the Baptist Church in this village, she adorned the doctrine she professed and eminently illustrated the teaching of her Master, "Blessed are the pure in heart." Her loss in the family circle, of which she was the center, and in society of which she was an ornament can only be realized by those who were nurtured by her care, consoled by her counsel, cheered by her conversation, profited by her example. Her loss is the greatest to those who know her best. Her husband, her children, will seek in vain for so good a councilor so correct a guide. Her aged mother mourns the loss of a dutiful, affectionate and only child, who in the ordinary course of nature instead of the welcoming should be the welcomed to the land of rest. Though for her family time may soothe the first gushings of grief, it will only the more exhibit how great, how irreparable their loss.