Stewarts of New York

Elam Decatur Phillips

Male 1826 - 1891  (65 years)


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  • Name Elam Decatur Phillips  [1
    Born 7 Aug 1826  Richland, Oswego, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died 11 Sep 1891  Pulaski, Richland Twp., Oswego County, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I44138  Stewartsnydotcom
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 

    Father Ancestors Horace A. Phillips,   b. 3 Apr 1789, Rupert, Bennington County, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Apr 1865, Delaware, Delaware, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Ancestors Susannah B. Weed,   b. 18 Jan 1795, Rupert, Bennington County, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Sep 1858, Van Buren, Jackson, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 1812 
    Family ID F16588  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Harriet N. McComber,   d. Abt 1854, Waukegan, Lake County, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 1848  Mexico, Oswego County, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F14448  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Ancestors Jane L. Thorpe,   b. 25 Mar 1831, Albion, Oswego, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Jan 1886  (Age 54 years) 
    Married 25 Mar 1855  Waukegan, Lake, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Children 
    Married: 1x1. Susan Catherine Phillips,   b. 26 Jan 1859, Van Buren, Jackson, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Apr 1900  (Age 41 years)  [natural]
    Married: 1x2. Unknown Phillips  [natural]
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F14467  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • September 11, 1891 ~ Elam Decatur Phillips, age 65 years, Minister, born in Pulaski, Son of Horace Phillips and Susan Price, died in Pulaski of valvular disease of the heart.
      [Transcriber Note: mother should be Susan Weed, not Susan Price]

      Newspaper Obituary - Thursday, September 17, 1891 Pulaski Democrat - Pulaski, New York - Died - Rev. Elam D. Phillips was born in this town August 2, 1826, and died in this village, September 11, 1891, aged 65 years, one month and nine days. His early advantages for mental improvement were very limited, but so great was his thirst for knowledge that they were all eagerly used. His youth was spent in exacting labor, for it early became alike a duty and privilege to support and infirm father and an aged mother. He was first married to Harriet N. McComber, at Mexico, New York, in 1848. They soon moved West, wherein Waukegan, Illinois, he buried his first companion, and in 1855 he found a help mate in the person of Jane L. Thorpe, who for 30 years shared his joys and sorrows, his sacrifices and successful labors, and Iowa, Nebraska, Vermont, and in this state, until her master, well pleased with her loving service, said to her, "it is enough, child, come home." She gladly obeyed the voice and went up to her father's house above, January 3, 1886. Brother Phillips was converted in 1858, three years after his second marriage, and soon after that event he began to preach the wonderful salvation through Christ Jesus. He served as pastor with varied success, three churches in Iowa, two in Nebraska, three and the state and one in Vermont. Health in other circumstances rendered many of these pastor its brief, but on all these fields precious trust was gathered which will be his crown of rejoicing forever. But his most self-denying and successful labors were performed as the First Baptist Missionary sent by the publication and Home Mission Societies to labor in the territory of Nebraska. For the space of three years, night and day, in the weariness, in the hunger and in tears often, he went forth over that portion of the great American desert, sowing the good seed of the kingdom, over all the then inhabited portions of that country he traveled, establishing Sunday schools for the children and youth, gathered the scattered sheep of Christ into gospel churches and even erecting houses of worship for their accommodation. Failing health led him to return to his native state, preaching in Colosse, Philadelphia and Albion, for several years with marked success. He also spent two years in Troy, of this state, doing good service is missionary into mission stations. The feeble health of his second help mate induced a return West to lengthen out if possible, a precious life. But God had ordered otherwise having provided some better place for her. Our brother, after toiling a few years, as best he could, returned to spend the remnant of his days in his native town. He was fortunate and favored in bringing with him a woman who was worthy to stand at his side, and whose wifely, skillful, constant, loving watch care has smoothed, if it did not lengthen, the journey down to the river. It is significant and impressive that he so quickly followed two sisters he esteemed so highly and lovingly so truly, Mrs. George Gurley and Mrs. Orlando Kent. Rev. E. D. Phillips would be styled perhaps a self-made man, but God made him what he was, every and each a man, and like some kind of wood or rock he possessed firmness and strengths, without scholastic polish. He had convictions, deep convictions of divine truth, and he had the courage and ability to set them forth in clear and strong language. He had, under difficulties, so studied and read books and authors that his fund of general and religious knowledge was very credible. He loved mission and evangelic work, and his preaching was well calculated to awaken thought, feeling, and aroused to action. He was at home in a revival. Such an atmosphere infused life strength and joy into his whole being. Notwithstanding external appearances, he had a generous heart, full of tenderness, sympathy and compassion for the afflicted and the suffering. In matters of mere opinion and personal preference he was as generous and lament as others; ready to sacrifice these on all suitable occasions for the generous good. He also had a capacity for business; and whether he was on the farm, in the store, in the registers office, or the moderator of a counsel, or an association, he was ready, efficient, dignified, prompt and courteous. But what was immeasurably more than all beside, he was a Christian, a home bowl, a modest one, despising all pretense, shame and flattery. He was sincere, earnest, devout and devoted. Christianity dominated his whole life. Yet he had as little of that self-righteous spirit, which is an abomination to God, is any minister, perhaps in the circle of our knowledge. Many have known him, have heard his voice in the pulpit, in exhortation and in prayer, but we will see his form and hear his voice no more on arts. He leaves a wife, a daughter, wife of E. T. Smith of this village, four brothers and three sisters.

  • Sources 
    1. [S570] Public Member Trees, Ancestry.com, (Name: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;;), Database online.
      Record for Jane Louisa Thorp



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