Hanna Maria Warner

Female 1820 - 1888  (67 years)


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  • Name Hanna Maria Warner 
    Born 28 Sep 1820  Vernon, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 23 May 1888  Pulaski, Oswego, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I41469  Stewartsnydotcom
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 

    Father Andrew Warner 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Elizabeth Clark Young 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F15511  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Ancestors Sylvanus Convers Huntington, Sr.,   b. 14 Apr 1820, Orange, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Mar 1894  (Age 73 years) 
    Married 12 Feb 1846  Sandy Creek, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Hannah Metelill Huntington,   b. 6 May 1853,   d. 18 Oct 1912  (Age 59 years)  [natural]
    Married: 1x2. Sylvanus Convers Huntington, Jr.,   b. 12 Jun 1857, Glen Castle, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F15510  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Newspaper Obituary - Thursday, May 24, 1888 Pulaski Democrat - Pulaski, New York - Died - At one o'clock this Wednesday morning, May 23, 1888 of pneumonia, Hannah M., wife of Hon. S. C. Huntington, of Pulaski, aged 67 years and 8 months. Funeral services will be held in the Congregational Church on Friday, May 25th at 2 o'clock, Rev. J. Douglas, D. D., officiating. A more extended obituary notice of the deceased will be published in these columns next week.

      Newspaper Obituary - Thursday, May 31, 1888 Pulaski Democrat - Pulaski, New York - At one o'clock this Wednesday morning, May 23, 1888, of pneumonia, Hannah M., wife of Hon. S. C. Huntington, of Pulaski, aged 67 years and 8 months. The deceased was born September 18th, 1820, at Vernon Center, Oneida County, in this State, the second daughter of Andrew Warner and Elizabeth Clark Young (the maiden name of her mother). With her parents she came to this county in 1837, they locating their home in the town of Sandy Creek on the farm where her brother, Hon. Andrew S. Warner, recently deceased. At an early age, she displayed a special fondness and aptitude for learning and after acquiring all that was possible in the common school of her neighborhood, she availed herself of the advantages of Mexico Academy, but finding this institution inadequate to meet the fullness of her intellectual aspirations, she resolved on seeking the higher and broader culture of a full college education. At the time Oberlin College was the only school of this higher grade that welcomed the female sex to its advantages. Thither she went and after spending nearly two years in its preparatory department, entered upon the college course of four years; and with such success as to graduate among the first, in test of scholarship, in her class. Returning to her home, she married to the present Hon. S. C. Huntington, of this village, a graduate of Dartmouth College, but whose acquaintances she first made as a classmate in Oberlin College. Kindred intellectual sympathies and culture cemented the bond of wedlock which has remained complete, harmonious and unimpaired through life, sundered only by the irresistible power of death With her husband, she went to the State of Tennessee where her superior scholarly attainments were called into requisition at the Hermitage of General Jackson in teaching a family school. Her next engagement in teaching was as Preceptress of Belleville Academy in Jefferson County. Subsequently removing to this village where her husband fixed his location in his legal profession, she conducted a select school, supplying to its young people the instructions of an academy, before the institution of Pulaski Academy was established. To many it would seem a difficult task to withdraw from a career that gave free and larger exercise to her cultured intellectual facilities and quietly betake one's self to the sequestered life, the homely duties and drudgeries, as they are often called, of domestic employments. But character often finds its best development and culture in the scenes, duties, trials and responsibilities of home, especially in that of motherhood. To these duties and responsibilities she gave herself with the most faithful devotion, finding no intellectual attainment useless in the training and education of her children. No domestic life has ever been more devoted, unostentatious and faithfuL as a wife and mother. During her collegiate course at Oberlin she united with the First Congregational Church and has retained there her church relations during her entire remaining life; not unfrequently visiting the place, which next to home, seemed to have the highest in her affections and in which she seemed never to lose or abate her interest. The beautiful in nature was her delight which especially displayed itself in her knowledge and culture of flowers. Her fidelity and kindness in all the relations of life as a neighbor as well as wife and mother, the simplicity of her life, her devotion to duty in home first of all, and in the community in which she lived, while they awaken regret for her loss, make luminous and sacred her memory, which will ever be tenderly, reverently cherished, especially by the bereaved household. With no doubting heart, no uncertain vision, they view her among the sanctified above. The earthly life of discipline and culture faithfully improved, has fitted her, by Divine grace, for angelic companionship and participation in angelic service above. Thither may they who mourn her departure follow her to join that wider and more glorious service with the redeemed and purified who have made the blessed exchange of the natural body for the spiritual body, of earth for heaven.