Stewarts of New York

Mary H. Ames

Female 1857 - Yes, date unknown


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Mary H. Ames was born on 6 Jan 1857 in Charlotte, Chautauqua, New York (daughter of David Hardy Ames and Clarissa Ann Edson); and died.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  David Hardy Ames was born on 24 May 1817 in Hancock, Hillsborough, New Hampshire; died on 23 Nov 1891 in Charlotte, Chautauqua, New York.

    David married Clarissa Ann Edson on 28 Dec 1839 in Charlotte, Chautauqua, New York. Clarissa (daughter of Barnabas Edson and Anna Walsworth) was born in 1816 in Genesee, New York, United States; died on 11 Nov 1888 in Charlotte, Chautauqua, New York, United States. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Clarissa Ann Edson was born in 1816 in Genesee, New York, United States (daughter of Barnabas Edson and Anna Walsworth); died on 11 Nov 1888 in Charlotte, Chautauqua, New York, United States.
    Children:
    1. Adeline A. Ames was born on 11 Oct 1844 in Charlotte, Chautauqua, New York; and died.
    2. Charles L. Ames was born on 30 Oct 1850 in Charlotte, Chautauqua, New York; and died.
    3. Edson David Ames was born on 14 Oct 1840 in Charlotte, Chautauqua, New York; and died.
    4. Homer Adelbert Ames was born on 3 Jul 1842 in Charlotte, Chautauqua, New York; and died.
    5. Jonathan Milton Ames was born on 1 Sep 1846 in Charlotte, Chautauqua, New York; and died.
    6. 1. Mary H. Ames was born on 6 Jan 1857 in Charlotte, Chautauqua, New York; and died.


Generation: 3

  1. 6.  Barnabas Edson was born on 27 Feb 1776 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts (son of Nathan Edson and Mary Hall); died on 20 May 1860 in Batavia, Genesee, New York, United States.

    Barnabas married Anna Walsworth in 1798 in Oneida, New York, United States. Anna was born in 1782 in Connecticut, United States; died on 22 Mar 1844 in Batavia, Genesee, New York, United States. [Group Sheet]


  2. 7.  Anna Walsworth was born in 1782 in Connecticut, United States; died on 22 Mar 1844 in Batavia, Genesee, New York, United States.
    Children:
    1. Barnabas Hall Edson was born in 1811 in Genesee, New York, United States; died on 18 Feb 1892 in Cherry Creek, Chautauqua, New York, United States.
    2. Lewis Morgan Edson was born on 22 Feb 1807 in Augusta, Oneida, New York; died on 28 Feb 1859 in Akron, Erie, New York.
    3. Gamaliel Edson was born in 1802 in Augusta, Oneida, New York, United States; died on 17 Aug 1879 in Monroe City, Ogle, Illinois, United States.
    4. Mary Polly Edson was born in 1805 in New York, United States.
    5. James L Edson was born in 1805 in New York, United States.
    6. James L Edson was born on 11 Nov 1803 in Augusta, Oneida, New York, United States; died on 5 Jan 1852 in Bertram, Michigan, United States.
    7. Mary Edson was born on 29 Sep 1800 in Augusta, Oneida, New York, United States; died on 22 Jun 1885 in New Milford, Winnebago, Illinois, United States.
    8. Lucinda M. Edson was born on 29 Aug 1817 in Batavia, Genesee, New York; died on 10 Nov 1896 in Sycamore, DeKalb, Illinois; was buried in Sycamore, DeKalb, Illinois.
    9. 3. Clarissa Ann Edson was born in 1816 in Genesee, New York, United States; died on 11 Nov 1888 in Charlotte, Chautauqua, New York, United States.
    10. Cyrenus Chapin Edson was born in 1813 in Genesee, New York, United States; died on 1 Aug 1878.
    11. Arminda Edson was born in 1821 in Genesee, New York, United States; died on 19 Aug 1877.


Generation: 4

  1. 12.  Nathan Edson was born on 19 Oct 1743 in Bridgewater, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States (son of Nathan Edson and Mary Sprague); died on 16 Aug 1825 in Smithfield, Madison, New York, United States; was buried in Stockbridge, Madison County, New York, USA.

    Notes:

    Son of Nathan & Mary Sprague Edson, married, 1766 in Bridgewater, MA to Mary Hall. Father of 11 children. Served in the French & Indian War and the Revolution. He was the first white settler in Stockbridge (then Augusta) in 1791. His gravestone was replaced by DAR. Father of Alford, Polly & Calvin.

    His father, Nathan, Sr.3/14/1716-3/31/1751 Peasant Point, Mass. Sentinel in King George's WarMother, Mary Sprague3/16/1722- both are buriedin Bridgewater, Plymouth, Mass

    "When the alarm came from Lexington Apr.19,1775,he was in Bridgewater and marched in Capt. Josiah Hayden's company of minute men and took part in the memorable battle of Lexington, the distance being 25 or 30 miles from Bridgewater. He enlisted May 1, 1775- less than 2 weeks later- and was with the new Continental army at the siege of Boston. He took part in the battle of Bunker Hill."

    The town of Bridgewater, in Plymouth county, Massachusetts, had been the home of the Edson family for almost a hundred years when Nathan Edson, great-great-grandson of the first Samuel, was born. His early years must have been more or less hard, for he could not have been over 12 years old when his father died. The care of the little farm and the work required of him in helping his mother bring up the family of younger children undoubedly strengthened the boy's character and prepared him for the hardships of a soldier's lot and of pioneering in the western wilderness. That he was a man of resolute nature and enterprising character we have abundant proof.
    His uncles, for some reason, remained loyalists as the days of the American revolution drew near, as many men of means and advancing years did. His uncle John, "a man of more than ordinary talents, amiable in his disposition, of affable manners and withall a pious and exemplary Christian and attached to the Church of England," says Elijah Hayward in "Edsons Early Settled in Bridgewater," published in 1864 although written in 1853, "was tried before a court in the early part of 1777 and sent to Boston. He was placed on board a guardship, but later removed to a private dwelling house, where he died in the fall of 1777 with the smallpox." Nathan did not share the opinions of his uncle but was an early supporter of the colonial cause...His grandfather Sprague died when Nathan was about 17 years old, and his granfather Edson died after Nathan was married and living out in Worcester county.
    Nathan Edson was short though stockily built. The Edsons were known as rugged men, for Elijah Hayward, who wrote the history just referred to and whose grandmother was an Edson, tells us that his greatgrandfather, Capt. Josiah Edson, wrote a history of Bridgewater in which he stated that "the Willis and Mitchell families were the tallest men, the Haywards the shortest and the Edsons and Bretts the most active and athletic." The manuscript for this book, which is said to have contained a minute history of the early families of Bridgewater, has not been preserved. Captain Edson was a son of Joseph Edson 13456. At his death in 1762 his papers came into possession of his son, Col. Josiah Edson, a prominent loyalist officer whose estate was confiscated in 1778 and who died a few months later of a heart broken by the turn of fate, his widow later suffering from poverty; and the manuscript was never since found.
    At the outbreak of the war between england and France in 1756, know in America as the French and Indian war, Nathan was probably 17 years old. A few years later he decided to serve the king as a soldier. He enlisted May 6, 1761, under Capt. Lemuel Dunbar of Bridgewater. He served to Dec. 7--a period of 7 months. After a rest of three months and a half he again enlisted, on Mar. 23, 1762, in Capt. Josiah Dunbar's company. This time he served 8 months, his term expiring Nov. 20. Altogether he saw a year and three months of service in that war. He was then 23 years old.
    After the war he probably remained in Bridgewater, and in a few years he was ready to establish a home for himself. Many of the young men of Bridgewater were striking out westward. Nathan became interested in Petersham, in Worcester county, and it is likely that he had already visited the place and decided to locate there. He was in love with a young woman named Mary Hall, who lived, we surmise, on a farm near the Edsons. It is probable that she was born in Raynham, a town next west of Bridgewater, and was a sister of Anna Hall of Raynham who married, some months later, Samulel Edson on Apr. 30, 1767, in Bridgewater. Samuel was Nathan's cousin and was the fifth of that name. Anna's mother was also named Anna. There is a romantic legend about Mary Hall, although it is more than likely that Mary's mother was the person to whom it refers. The mother of Mary Hall was Anna Giffins, we are told, and the family lived in the north of Ireland and were Scotch. At the age of 17 Mary Hall--or Anna Giffins--was induced by an aunt to embark for America. The final persuasion was a generous sum in gold guineas, which the girl quilted in three rows in her skirt. The ship was wrecked. Mary had her aunt by the arm when they went into the water. The weight of Mary's skirt was so great that she had to slip it and lose it--gold and all. A sailor grasped Mary by the hair and saved both the women. For seven days they lived on black cherries from a cask of rum (from a letter written Nov. 29, 1893, by Mrs. Rebecca (Gregg) Moon).
    After awhile the aunt grew homesick and wished Mary to go back with her, the story runs, but she chose not to go. She worked in a city. Her father came after her but she did not go with him: she was so frightened by crossing the water she did not want to try it again. When the father got home the mother soon died; then soon the father...Mary Hall was married on Sept. 2, 1766, to Nathan Edson, in Bridgewater. Tradition says she was born in 1740.
    Soon after their marriage in 1766 Nathan Edson and his wife settled in Petersham, over in Worcester county. There their children were born--first Anna, named after her grandmother, and then Nathan, John, Willard, Alfred, Barnabas, Mary (Polly), Calvin, Sarah and Olive. It is said that there were eleven children--that Gamaliel was the youngest son--but only ten are in the town records of Petersham. Gamaliel is said to have drowned in Madison Lake in New York when a young man.
    Nathan Edson had lived in Petersham some 8 or 9 years when events began to shape themselves toward a war against the mother country. Organizations known as "minute men" were being formed among the farmers in Massachusetts, to be ready on short notice to defend their rights and interests against British soldiers, who were quartered in Boston. Nathan belonged to the Bridgewater company, where he often visited and traded. He was 36 years old and had five children, but his courageous spirit and his familiarity with arms made him a valuable man. Many of his relatives were enlisted in the cause--over 30 Edsons later saw active service--and his wife, with the Scotch blood that felt no love for England, was more than willing to look after the farm and take care of the household while her husband shouldered his musket to fight for liberty.
    When the alarm came from Lexington Apr. 19, 1775, he was in Bridgewater and marched in Capt. Josiah Hayden's company of minute men and took part in the memorable battle of Lexington, the distance being 25 or 30 miles from Bridgewater. He enlisted May 1, 1775--less than two weeks later--and was with the new Continental army at the siege of Boston. He took part in the battle of Bunker Hill. In this famous battle there were eight Edsons, all of whom survived the fight. They were Abijah Edson, Caleb Edson, Hosea Edson, Jonathan Edson, Nathan Edson of Stafford, Samuel Edsons, Thomas Edson and our Nathan Edson.
    On Apr. 2, 1777, he enlisted as a sergeant in Captain Edward Cobb's company in Col. Jonathan Titcomb's regiment. He served two months at Bristol, Rhode Island, not far from Bridgewater. Upon the expiration of this enlistment June 21 he spent a few weeks at home and then on July 9, 1777, he reenlisted in the same company, in Col. Thomas Robinson's regiment, to serve till the end of the year--5 months and 22 days. At the end of this term he immediately enlisted again--Jan. 1, 1778--as a sergeant in Capt. Joseph Cole's company a period of over 9 months. The activites of war were shifting to the south: New England was no longer the pivotal point of the struggle. He had done his
    part: he was now 40 years old. There was a 7-month old daughter at home he wanted to see, named after her mother, Mary. Which was his mother's name. also. He hung up his gun, and therafter never took part in any battle.
    The war was ended in a few years. Victory crowned the stuggle of the revolutionary army, and the colony became the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Nathan tended his farm in Petersham and prospered: his children were growing up. The oldest daughter, Anna, married on Feb. 26, 1786, a young soldier named Robert Willis Seaver. Then the next year the son Willard, a fine lad of 14 years, was killed by a bolt of lightning. He and another boy were bringing a pail of water (It has been said that they were carrying a sack of wheat from a field and were transferring it from the shoulder of one boy to that of the other.). A storm was coming, and as the boys came into the door yard the lightning struck, killing Willard and stunning his companion. The mother was so shocked that she went into spasms: always after that she became sick at the approach of a storm.
    When the first census was taken in 1790 the family of Nathan Edson of Petersham consisted of himself and one son over 16 years of age, a son under 16, three daughters and his wife Mary. The older sons--Nathan, aged 21, and John, aged 20, were evidently not at home; Alfred was nearly 16, Barnabas was 14 and Calvin, 10. The daughters at home were Mary, Sarah and Olive. Alfred was probably working for some of his relatives in another town. In 1791 the family moved from Massachusetts westward into central New York, to what is now Madison county, at that time being apart of Tioga county. The history of Madison county published in 1880 by James H. Smith says that "the first settlement in the town of Stockbridge, at that time called Whitestown, was made in 1791 by Nathan Edson, who came from New Hampshire with his sons John, Barney, and Calvin, young unmarried men, and daughters Nancy, Sarah, Polly and Olive, the first of whom was married to Robert W. Seaver, who came with them. Nathan Edson took up the lot next north of the souteast corner of the town."
    Alfred came a few years later and located on the same lot. He later was married (the marriage intention was recorded back in Bridgewater, Mass., April 16, 1796) to Eunice Snow, his cousin. Jonathan Snow, a relative of the Edsons, came to Stockbridge soon after them. Another early settler of the town was Oliver Stewart, also a veteran of the Revolution, who came with his family from Washington county in 1796. His daughter Lydia became the second wife of Alfred Edson in 1801. Alfred removed to the south part of the town and subsequently leased a farm from the Indians, where he continued to live until his death. He built a very large house, with many rooms and fireplaces.
    Nathan, the oldest son, married a Miss White of Oneida county. He resided in Cleveland, Ohio, where he had a beautiful home, at the time of his death. He was visiting in New York City and dropped dead on the street. He belonged to several lodges and there was a very large funeral, with special cars and a large floral display.
    John, the second son, married first a girl named Sarah and second, Clarissa. In 1806 he removed to Batavia, N.Y.
    Barnabas, the fifth son, married Anna Walsworth in 1798 and removed to the locality of Batavia soon after John. He subsequently settled in Chautauqua county.
    Calvin, the sixth son, married Dolly May in 1801. He resided in the south edge of Lenox in Madison county at the time of his death.
    Nancy Seaver and her husband removed to Alexander in Genesee county, of which Batavia is the county seat. Later they moved to Chautauqua county.
    Polly married Hon Devine in 1793--their marriage was the first one in the twon of Stockbridge. Jon Devine died a few years after his marriage and Polly later married daniel Thurston, who succeeded him on the same farm. her third husband was Michael Tooke.
    Sally Edson married William Devine, a brother to John. He kept a tavern and later moved to the western part of the state. In April, 1809, he and Barnabas Cole, Barnabas Edson and Robert W. Seaver bought neighboring lots in the present town of Charlotte, Chautauqua county, N.Y.
    Olive, the youngest daughter, married Zenas Cole, who bought Calivin Edson's farm. They removed to Cincinnati.
    In 1820 Nathan Edson, then over 80 years of age, moved to a small farm in the north part of town which he leased of the Indians. In the past 30 years he had seen the locality change to a thriving community from the domain of the Mohawks, Cayugas, Oneidas and Tuscaroras. His cabin had stood in a wilderness that was now overcrowded with farms. His children were grown and many of them had moved on westawrd to new frontiers. He lived repected by his neighbors and honored by his descendants: although not rich he was comfortably circumstanced and never applied for a pension. He was a democrat in politics. He lived to see the semi-centennial of american independence, and now reposes in a grave marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution, beside his wife, in a plot of land he gave off his farm between Munnsville and Solsville.
    Nathan Edson died in Stockbridge (at that time a part of Smithfield), Madison county, N.Y., on Aug. 16, 1825, aged 86 years, and his widow Mary died in the same locatlity on Dec. 12, 1836. --Nathan Edson and His Descendents

    Nathan married Mary Hall on 2 Sep 1766 in Bridgewater, Plymouth, Massachusetts. Mary (daughter of Stephen Hall and Mary Anna Griffin, daughter of Anna Griffin) was born on 27 Apr 1739 in Medford, Massachusetts; died on 12 Dec 1838 in Stockbridge, Madison, New York. [Group Sheet]


  2. 13.  Mary Hall was born on 27 Apr 1739 in Medford, Massachusetts (daughter of Stephen Hall and Mary Anna Griffin, daughter of Anna Griffin); died on 12 Dec 1838 in Stockbridge, Madison, New York.

    Notes:

    Death source was Helen Hawkins posting in WorldConnect. email: simplyrose@earthlink.net 2004

    Died:
    Source was Helen Hawkins posting in WorldConnect. email: simplyrose@earthlink.net 2004

    Children:
    1. Mary Polly Edson was born on 24 Mar 1778 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States; died on 8 Sep 1867 in Stockbridge, Madison, New York, USA.
    2. 6. Barnabas Edson was born on 27 Feb 1776 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts; died on 20 May 1860 in Batavia, Genesee, New York, United States.
    3. Alfred Edson was born on 13 Nov 1774 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts; died on 27 Nov 1838 in Stockbridge, Madison, New York.
    4. Anna Edson was born on 14 Nov 1767 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts; died on 24 Mar 1852 in Charlotte Center, Chautauqua, New York.
    5. Calvin Edson was born on 10 Jun 1780 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts; died on 4 Sep 1831 in Lenox, Madison, New York.
    6. John Edson was born on 1 Feb 1771 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts; and died.
    7. Olive Edson was born on 24 May 1785 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts; died on 4 Mar 1851 in Springfield, Clark, Ohio.
    8. Sarah Edson was born on 14 May 1783 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts; and died.
    9. Nathan Edson was born on 31 Mar 1769 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts; died in in New York City, New York, New York, United States.
    10. Willard Edson was born on 14 Oct 1772 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts; died on 14 Oct 1787 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts.
    11. Gamaliel Edson was born in 1787 in Petersham, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States.
    12. Nancy Edson



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